Small Cherry Sliding Lid Box – part 2

It took a bit of planning but I managed to figure out where I wanted to put the stopped dadoes, and how I was going to cut them. I struggled with the how more than the where. Even though I have an appropriately sized plow plane, I don’t have a good way to hold the wood for this situation. Its just a confirmation that I need to finish my Moxon Vice and probably put some holes in my work bench, but that’s another project.

View of the end while chiseling the tails.
End view while chiseling the tails.

With this process figured out I was able to calculate the height of the remaining end. I ripped the waste off the end and planed it smooth. I cut the rest of the dovetails just like before.

I ended up marking the edges of the stopped dadoes nice and deep with a marking gauge. Then removed a bit of wood between the lines with a chisel in a paring action. Next I lightly chopped in the stops for the dado. With saw in hand I kerfed toward the inside of my scribe lines, being cautious to no go past the stop cuts. Then with a bit of hand chiseling I removed some of the material. A second pass with the saw and chisel and I’m about half way into the board. This should be deep enough. Some final cleanup with the chisel and refining of the end cuts and it looks good. Four stopped dadoes, and three through dadoes later I am done.  This may seem like a crude way to do it, but it actually went faster than I had expected.

End view of the raised panel lid.
End view of the raised panel lid.

With a Stanley 5-1/4 set a bit rank, I planed the top and bottom panels to approximate width, much quicker than using a saw.  I then cut them to length and shot the ends with my bench hook and a smoothing plane, overly simple and worked perfectly. With the panels back in the vice I tipped the plane and put the bevel on. I set the iron a little shallower for the cuts, while it took longer, it ended up with no tear out. A few passes with a smoother gave me a nice final surface.

Exploded end view of cherry sliding lid box.
Exploded end view of cherry sliding lid box.

Time for test fitting and some final adjustments. Alright there were quite a few minor adjustment, but things did end up looking pretty good. With it disassembled a bit of glue on the dove tails, it sits over night to dry.

Front end view of the completed cherry sliding lid box.
Front end view of the completed cherry sliding lid box.

The next morning I grabbed a saw and gently cut the extra long dovetail bits off. I did this to minimize plane blow out as some were rather large cut offs. With the smother I did the final trimming and smoothing of all the surfaces. The top edge was planed to the same thickness as the lid. All the dovetails were planed smooth with the sides. I then grabbed the polissoir and started burnishing all the surfaces. With a good prepared surface from a sharp well tuned smoother the burnishing with the polissoir is elegant. The surface is so smooth. So smooth that most people assume there is a finish on it, I would classify it as a semi gloss appearance.

Completed Cherry Sliding Lid Box
Back end view of the completed cherry sliding lid box.

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